Volume IV: What works, what matters, what lasts

Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL)

"[C]urrent assessment practices are not producing an effective learning environment in STEM classrooms because they are actually summative evaluation not formative assessment, too infrequent, not precise, often incongruent with course goals, and inadequate in providing feedback to students, instructors, and organizations. These issues need to be addressed in any process that seeks to improve learning and teaching."

Assessment Essays:

  • Process - The Missing Element
    - David M. Hanson, Professor of Chemistry - State University of New York-Stony Brook
    - Daniel K. Apple, Pacific Crest Software
    "[S]cience education needs to be concerned equally with content (the structure of knowledge) and process (the development of skills for acquiring, applying, and generating knowledge). Since education is defined as the construction of knowledge, we define process education as the development of skills for acquiring, applying, and generating knowledge. Process education becomes increasingly important, in fact critical, as our knowledge base expands, as society addresses interdisciplinary and more complicated problems, and as businesses seek technological developments on shorter and shorter time scales."

  • Assessment Not Evaluation is the Key to Learning
    - David M. Hanson, Professor of Chemistry - State University of New York-Stony Brook
    "Content knowledge traditionally has been strong in STEM courses. Learner and community centered classrooms that engage students in the learning process and involve learning teams and learning communities are becoming more and more popular, and team problem-based learning has been a tradition in engineering, business, and medical programs. In contrast, only evaluation, and not assessment, commonly is found in STEM classrooms, even though assessment is essential to learning."