Volume IV: What works, what matters, what lasts

April 2: Lessons learned from the work of leaders

Essays, Stories & Reports:

  • What works: A PKAL essay
    Advancing the momentum toward reform
    Jeanne L. Narum, Director - Project Kaleidoscope
    A current challenge is to move the initiative of reform from the heart and mind of an individual agent of change into the formal policies and practices of an institution.

  • What works: A PKAL report
    Leaders: lessons learned
    - From the March 2004 PKAL Steering Committee Meeting at Bryn Mawr College/Villanova Conference Center
    The new PKAL steering committee, together with advisors and staff, met to distill their experiences as leaders, establishing a foundation for a more intense focus on leadership development.

Resources from PKAL:

  • What matters: A PKAL essay
    Creating something new: a leader's perspective
    - Adapted from PKAL’s Volume III - Structures for Science: A Handbook for Planning Facilities for Undergraduate Natural Science Communities, 1995.
    It is not individuals who determine curriculum or the institutional structure, it is the faculty and administrators as a whole community. When reforms are one-person projects, change is not sustainable.

  • What matters: A PKAL essay
    Guidelines for effective collaborations
    - Adapted from PKAL’s Volume III - Structures for Science: A Handbook for Planning Facilities for Undergraduate Natural Science Communities, 1995.
    It is important when committees are established to tackle critical issues, there are common expectations within the group as to how the committee will function.

Resources from other sources:

  • What matters: A PKAL resource
    Developing faculty into institutional leaders
    - A report from a session at the 2002 annual meeting of the Council of Colleges of Arts and Science, facilitated by PKAL leaders Jeanne Narum - Project Kaleidoscope, David Brakke - James Madison University and James Gentile - Hope College
    Specific examples are presented from a wide range of campuses about how senior administrators establish formal and informal policies and programs to identify and nurture leaders within their faculty.

  • What matters: A resource
    The essence of leadership in one minute's reading
    - A excerpt from an article published in The Minneapolis Star Tribune, June 30, 1987.
    The essence of leadership is distilled into eight attitudes that are indispensible to the management of complexity.

TIP: To increase the number of leaders on your campus, take personal responsibility for being either a mentor or a mentee.