2004 - 2006 Leadership Initiative Seminar: Trinity University

Seminar Session Descriptions

Plenary I
My personal story as a leader—some lessons learned

Karan Watson, Dean of Faculties, Associate Provost, Texas A&M University

What fun I’ve been having. Always seeing myself as an outsider because of my identity as a woman and an engineer (so not only do some men take pause in figuring me out, even more women do). The cumulative effect, although sometimes frustrating, has made me stronger. From an early time in my career I realized that I must find my balance between personal identity, identity politics, and my profession. Thank goodness for the ‘elders’ who paved the way. I hope to share some of the wisdom that has been offered to me. Ultimately, we all know that the most valuable and lasting effects of leadership depend on how firmly rooted the leader is in caring for the followers.


Break-out session A
Involving the whole institution

  1. Understanding the why and how of integrating assessment into the work of institutional transformation
    • Karen K. Oates, SENCER/Vice President for Academic & Student Affairs, Harrisburg University of Science
  2. Institutional transformation – leading change on campus requires a set of conditions intentionally constructed to support the change initiative. It also requires the specific attention of faculty. In this session we will look at how to create the conditions and environment which will foster new ways of thinking about assessment. Assessment for and by faculty is at the heart of institutional transformation. Data, evidence, and observable results created by the faculty are critical to the transformation process.

  3. Building learning communities
    • Benjamin C. Flores, Model Institutions of Excellence (MIE) Program Director, University of Texas El Paso
  4. The UTEP Model Institutions for Excellence Initiative is in its 11th year of activities. This major effort has had the overarching purpose of shifting the culture of the Colleges of Science and Engineering at UTEP toward a philosophy that promotes student retention and success in STEM disciplines. Since the implementation of MIE activities, the first year retention has increased significantly, and the average number of years to graduation in STEM disciplines has decreased steadily. Ultimately, MIE activities have successfully increased the number of STEM degrees awarded annually to Hispanics. In this session we will explore some of the strategies that we have implemented and the impact these strategies have had:

    • Entering Student Placement, Advising, and Learning Communities
    • Academic Support for the Middle Years
    • Undergraduate Research and Mentoring
    • Student Involvement in Outreach Activities
    • Curriculum Innovation
    • Scholarly Teaching
  5. Integrating attention to goals for student learning across the curriculum
    • Lisa M. Sullivan, Associate Dean of the Faculty, Harvey Mudd College
  6. This session will examine the potential for an intitutional mission or vision statement to serve as an agent for educational change. Utilizing a broad founding goal of integrated and responsible science, Harvey Mudd faculty and administrators have identified an associated set learning objectives and desired competencies. These shared educational objectives have been used, in turn, to undergird a substantial curricular reform that at present unites more than one third of the campus curriculum. Early assessment efforts point to important opportunities to extend integrated learning efforts further still.

  7. EPICS: Integrating Engineering Education and Community Service
    • Leah H. Jamieson, Associate Dean of Engineering for Undergraduate Education, Purdue University Main Campus

    The importance of linking STEM fields to societal needs is gaining attention with reports such as the National Academy of Engineering’s publications on The Engineer of 2020. The Engineering Projects in Community Service – EPICS – program is proving to be a successful model for integrating engineering design with community contexts. EPICS highlights the ways that long-term, for-credit projects in the community provide the time and context for experiences that enable our students to:

    • Develop technical depth and multi-disciplinary breadth
    • Experience start-to-finish design
    • Acquire and hone many professional skills
    • Create products that have a significant impact on their community
    • Grow as individuals, engineers, and citizens.

    Initiated at Purdue in 1995, EPICS programs are now operating at 15 universities and one high school. Over 2000 students have participated in EPICS courses at Purdue since 1995; in the 2003-04 academic year; over 1500 students on over 150 teams participated at the 15 EPICS universities. In 2005, EPICS was awarded the NAE’s Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education.


Experiential learning exercise
Imagining what “success” would look like

Jeanne L. Narum, Director, Project Kaleidoscope


Plenary II
Key issues to consider to ensure the success of all students—what questions to ask; who to have at the table, etc.

  • Benjamin C. Flores, Model Institutions of Excellence (MIE) Program Director, University of Texas El Paso
  • Leah H. Jamieson, Associate Dean of Engineering for Undergraduate Education, Purdue University Main Campus

Two major themes run through this seminar, with the “all” of all students linking them. A panel of seminar facilitators will outline, from their experiences, what campuses need to know about their students, and how to find those answers, as they work toward institutional transformation.


Cluster consulting groups—I

Each team leaves with an agenda for action that is both feasible and challenging, given its particular institutional mission and circumstances. With seminar facilitators as consultants, clusters of two or three teams will begin the process of planning, revisiting and clarifying their vision and goals.. Each will prepare a poster to be critiqued during the following reception.


Snapshots
21st century spaces for 21st century STEM learning communities PKAL-active architects

  • Michael J. Reagan, Director of Science & Technology, Burt Hill Kosar Rittelmann Associates
  • Elizabeth Ericson, Principal, Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott

Contemporary STEM learning communities must be supported by science facilities that embody a variety of forms, functions, and uses. The variety of forms include exterior expressions and interior organizations. Exterior expressions range from traditional to contextual to contemporary. Interior organizations can differ significantly between disciplines but also within disciplines responding to alternative functions, uses and occupancies. Contemporary science facilities must accommodate a variety of functions to support alternative learning and teaching styles. Flexibility is key to accommodate these styles. Science facilities must accommodate a variety of uses including their primary intended use but also alternative uses that were not initially intended. When properly designed, contemporary STEM learning communities can be provided with flexible, functional, multi-use science facilities that support lab rich, hands-on, experiential learning.


Plenary III
The host site story: Reform of introductory science courses for non-science majors

  1. Introduction & Overview
    • Edward C. Roy, Jr., Emeritus Professor of Geosciences, Trinity University
  2. Reform of Introductory Science Courses for Non-Science Majors
    • Leo Pezzementi, Professor of Biology, Birmingham-Southern College
  3. Redesign of Exploring Earth, an inquiry-based studio format course
    • Glenn C. Kroeger, Associate Professor of Geosciences, Trinity University
  4. Integrative Biology at Trinity University
    • Denise S. Pope, Assistant Professor of Biology, Trinity University
    • Kevin Livingstone, Assistant Professor of Biology, Trinity University
  5. Codifying Materials for the Presentation of Scientific Investigations into 17th Century Dutch Art
    • Erich S. Uffelman, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Washington and Lee University

Trinity University and the 15 other members of the Associated Colleges of the South were awarded a grant by the W. M. Keck Foundation of Los Angeles for the Reform of Science Courses for Non-Science Majors. Trinity is the host institution for the grant. This session will demonstrate how the members of a consortium can work together to solve a problem that is common to all 16 institutions. An overview of the program will be presented followed by three specific examples of course reform. The examples will be from the departments of geosciences and biology at Trinity and the Department of Chemistry at Washington and Lee University. Time will be available for discussion following each of the presentations.


Breakout session B
Taking the kaleidoscopic perspective as you plan

  1. Seeking support—internal and external for your initiatives
    • Laird Yock, Vice President & Managing Director, Grenzebach Glier & Associates

    Philanthropy is going through one of the most dramatic changes ever. The role the philanthropist plays at your institution is different than it was only a few years ago. Together, we will discuss those changes and the impact those changes require in the role of you and your colleagues.

    You can’t do it alone! This session will be an interactive exploration of the role of institutional leadership, the development staff and faculty in securing philanthropic dollars. What are the keys to an effective partnership and why it is imperative to work together.

    Plus, understand the requirements and rational for making an effective case internally before there is any chance to be successful externally. And, we will explore the elements of successful proposals and the difference in proposal content for grants from corporations and those for gifts from foundations and from individuals and why.

  2. Planning spaces for science that serve all students
    • Michael J. Reagan, Director of Science & Technology, Burt Hill Kosar Rittelmann Associates
    • Elizabeth Ericson, Principal, Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott

    Learning styles can differ significantly from student to student and contemporary science facilities must provide a variety of learning venue to respond to these differences. Formal and informal, hands-on and didactic, group and solitary are a few of the learning styles that must be supported. Additionally, faculty should be provided with flexible science facilities that allow fast and easy changes to allow them to tailor teaching styles on a day-to-day basis.

  3. Linking to the world beyond the campus: K-16 initiatives
    • Spencer A. Benson, Director of the Center of teaching Excellence, University of Maryland College Park
    • Karen K. Oates, SENCER/Vice President for Academic & Student Affairs, Harrisburg University of Science

    Spencer Benson: It is increasingly important for all citizens to have adequate knowledge and understanding of the science that impact their daily lives. Finding appropriate ways to address science literacy and student engagement needs that occurs throughout a student’s educational journey from elementary through post graduate school is challenging. This is especially true for students who are not majoring in a STEM discipline. These students have science educational needs that are different from STEM majors. These differences pose unique challenges for non-majors classes that are directed toward pre-service elementary and middle school education majors and other non-STEM sectors of the student population.

    One means to address the educational needs of K12 students and the teachers is through the formation of K16 partnerships that build science education communities that share expertise on content and pedagogy. A number of such partnerships have been formed under the aegis of the National Science Foundation MSP program. I will discuss the challenges and lessons learning as a partner institution in the NSF funded Vertical Integration Partnership (VIPK16), an educational collaboration and experiment that involves a local county school system and the University System of Maryland.

  4. EPICS: Integrating Engineering Education and Community Service
    • Leah H. Jamieson, Associate Dean of Engineering for Undergraduate Education, Purdue University Main Campus

    The importance of linking STEM fields to societal needs is gaining attention with reports such as the National Academy of Engineering’s publications on The Engineer of 2020. The Engineering Projects in Community Service – EPICS – program is proving to be a successful model for integrating engineering design with community contexts. EPICS highlights the ways that long-term, for-credit projects in the community provide the time and context for experiences that enable our students to:

    • Develop technical depth and multi-disciplinary breadth
    • Experience start-to-finish design
    • Acquire and hone many professional skills
    • Create products that have a significant impact on their community
    • Grow as individuals, engineers, and citizens.

    Initiated at Purdue in 1995, EPICS programs are now operating at 15 universities and one high school. Over 2000 students have participated in EPICS courses at Purdue since 1995; in the 2003-04 academic year; over 1500 students on over 150 teams participated at the 15 EPICS universities. In 2005, EPICS was awarded the NAE’s Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education.


Experiential learning exercise
Considering the Challenge of Communication

Jeanne L. Narum, Director, Project Kaleidoscope


Breakout session C
Designing “science for all curriculum”

  1. Building a Global Dimension into programs that ensure the success of all students
    • Spencer A. Benson, Director of the Center of teaching Excellence, University of Maryland College Park
    • Stuart J. Birnbaum, Associate Professor of Earth & Environmental Science, University of Texas at San Antonio

    Spencer Benson: At the university level science literacy for non-STEM majors is often the responsibility of general education courses. General education courses often have the advantage and burden of being “the science course” that must define science and address literacy for students that live in a world that is increasingly globally connected and which new complex ethical science issues continue to arise. I will discuss pedagogical approaches in two general education STEM courses that strive to balance the needs for content, student engagement, global perspectives and student engagement, and the ethical dimensions of science.

  2. Understanding the why and how of integrating assessment into the work of institutional transformation
    • Karen K. Oates, SENCER/Vice President for Academic & Student Affairs, Harrisburg University of Science
  3. Institutional transformation – leading change on campus requires a set of conditions intentionally constructed to support the change initiative. It also requires the specific attention of faculty. In this session we will look at how to create the conditions and environment which will foster new ways of thinking about assessment. Assessment for and by faculty is at the heart of institutional transformation. Data, evidence, and observable results created by the faculty are critical to the transformation process.

  4. Roles and responsibilities of academic administrators
    • Lisa M. Sullivan, Associate Dean of the Faculty, Harvey Mudd College
    • Leo Pezzementi, Professor of Biology, Birmingham-Southern College
    • Michael Fischer, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Trinity University
    • Karan Watson, Dean of Faculties, Associate Provost, Texas A&M University
  5. Building learning communities
    • Benjamin C. Flores, Model Institutions of Excellence (MIE) Program Director, University of Texas El Paso
  6. The UTEP Model Institutions for Excellence Initiative is in its 11th year of activities. This major effort has had the overarching purpose of shifting the culture of the Colleges of Science and Engineering at UTEP toward a philosophy that promotes student retention and success in STEM disciplines. Since the implementation of MIE activities, the first year retention has increased significantly, and the average number of years to graduation in STEM disciplines has decreased steadily. Ultimately, MIE activities have successfully increased the number of STEM degrees awarded annually to Hispanics. In this session we will explore some of the strategies that we have implemented and the impact these strategies have had:

    • Entering Student Placement, Advising, and Learning Communities
    • Academic Support for the Middle Years
    • Undergraduate Research and Mentoring
    • Student Involvement in Outreach Activities
    • Curriculum Innovation
    • Scholarly Teaching

Cluster consulting group—II

Teams complete the development of their agenda for action, responding to critiques of “vision/goals” and moving to determine specific strategies and actions. Agendas to be presented on Sunday morning.


Plenary IV
Leadership in Focusing on the Future

Melvin D. George, President Emeritus, University of Missouri

Leading into the future requires both a vision of what that future should be and an assessment of the trends and constraints that will influence what happens. Having such a vision and being able to make such an assessment are two commonly-listed characteristics of good leaders. But should a leader have a vision to bring to the group or work to develop a group vision from the members– or both? Little is said about the tension that often exists between a vision held by a leader and the vision(s) of the others with whom that leader must work. If those visions are in conflict, then what? And how much confidence should one place in identifying likely future trends? Little is said about how dead wrong most assessments of the future have been – the failure of the higher education to predict future trends, from affirmative action to the rise of anti-science attitudes, is easily documented. So how much time and effort should be spent in making assessments that perhaps have no validity? In this session, we will explore interactively these two issues that relate directly to leadership for the future.